Wednesday, November 25, 2009

The next IGT HPC Work Group meeting

The next Israeli Association of Grid Technologies High-Performance Computing Work Group meeting

13:45-16:00, January 20, 2010 IGT Office Maskit 4 Hertzeliya

Agenda:

13:45-14:00 Opening by Avner Algom and Guy Tel-Zur

14:00-15:00 Prof. Tilo Wettig, Ph.D., University of Regensburg, Germany - The QPACE supercomputer (Live via Webex)

15:00-15:15 Coffee break

15:15-16:00 Dr. Guy Tel-Zur, IGT – Challenges in teaching Parallel Computing


Program:

14:00-15:00

Prof. Tilo Wettig, Ph.D., University of Regensburg, Germany - The QPACE supercomputer

Prof. Tilo Wettig will give an overview of the QPACE supercomputer, which was
developed by a collaboration of several academic institutions and the IBM R&D lab Boeblingen, Germany. QPACE is a massively parallel architecture, allowing a single application to run on thousands of nodes. Individual nodes consist of a PowerXCell 8i processor and an FPGA that functions as network coprocessor. The nodes are connected in a 3-dimensional torus. The target application is quantum chromodynamics (QCD, thus the name QPACE = QCD parallel computing on the Cell), but the machine is also suitable for other mesh-based applications. QPACE is currently #1 on the Green 500 list, i.e., it is the most power-efficient supercomputer in the world.

15:15-16:00
Dr. Guy Tel-Zur, IGT – Challenges in teaching Parallel Computing

We are now in the Multi-Core era; however there are not enough graduates from Computer Science and Computer Engineering departments who luck an elementary knowledge in Parallel Computing.

The talk will cover challenges in teaching an introductory course to Parallel Computing.

Such a course is given by the speaker at the Ben-Gurion University in Beer-Sheva to Electrical and Computer Engineering students. The Syllabus and the infrastructure for teaching this course will be described and a few demos will be presented.

To reserve your place, please send your details to: info@grid.org.il


Date Dec 9, 2009 13:45 16:00
Location IGT Offices

Sunday, November 08, 2009

Parallel Computing on Windows

There are many ways to use MPI. In this post I show how to install and use the DeinoMPI implementation which looks very cool and is free.
The screen captures in this post were taken using the nice SnapIt tool.

Part 1: Installing DeinoMPI

After downloading and starting the msi file:








Part 2: Configuring DeinoMPI
2.1 Start the deinoMPI daemon:


2.2 Credentials


Part 3: Testing
In this part I show how to compile a MPI program with the free Bloodshed DevC++ IDE.
I use the famous cpi.c code


This installation is "Local Only" (perhaps in one of my future posts I will show how to use this tool with more than one node):


The Windows Firewall is noticing the new player:


Here is the execution and output window:


It is nice to see the Task Manager showing the 10 parallel running processes:


Part 4: A little-bit Mathematics

The integration in cpi.c is done for f(x)=1/(1+x**2) between 0 to 1.
It is nice to replace this function by f(x)=sqrt(1-x**2) also between 0 to 1 (the unit circle).
Strangely enough, integration of either of these functions between 0 to 1 is equal to Pi/4.
The Sage Symbolic Mathematics tool is a good way to show the difference between the two functions: